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Negotiation


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The Art Of Negotiating
   In Today’s World, The Skilled Negotiator Has The Advantage
  By: Liz Tahir
Negotiating skills are not usually part of our formal education, though we use these skills all day, every day. These skills are at the very core of both our professional and personal lives. It doesn’t matter if we run General Motors or the corner snowball stand or our households, we all have to communicate and convince effectively.

To be a Better Bargainer, Bracket Your Objective
  By: Roger Dawson
Whether you're bargaining in your favorite antique store, negotiating for an increase in pay, or trying to get the rock-bottom price for a new car, you'll do better if you use a technique that negotiators call Bracketing.

To Be a More Powerful Negotiator Never Say Yes to the First Offer
  By: Roger Dawson
Power Negotiators know that you should never say Yes to the first offer (or counter-offer) because it automatically triggers two thoughts in the other person's mind.

To Get a Better Deal, Learn How to Use the Vise Gambit
  By: Roger Dawson
The Vise is a very effective negotiating Gambit and what it will do for you will amaze you. The Vise Gambit is the simple little expression: "You'll have to do better than that."

To Win in Negotiations, Learn How to Taper Concessions
  By: Roger Dawson
In extended negotiations over price, be careful that you don't set up a pattern in the way that you make concessions.

Unethical Negotiating Gambits and How to Protect Yourself Against Them
  By: Roger Dawson
Unless you're so familiar with the unethical gambits that people can use to get you to sweeten the deal that you spot them right away, you'll find that you will make unnecessary concessions just to get the other side to agree with your proposal.

Want to Get More at the Bargaining Table? Learn to Flinch at Proposals
  By: Roger Dawson
Power Negotiators know that you should always flinch-react with shock and surprise at the other side's proposals.

What To Watch For When the Talking is Over and It's Time to Get the Deal in Writing
  By: Roger Dawson
Most people think of negotiating as the verbal give and take that takes people from their different wants and needs to a point of agreement. That, of course, is the heart of negotiating but just as important is the transition to the written contract that formalizes the verbal agreement.

When Negotiations Stall, Position the Other Side for Easy Acceptance
  By: Roger Dawson
When you're negotiating with people who have studied negotiating, and are proud of their ability to negotiate, you can get ridiculously close to agreement, and the entire negotiation will still fall apart on you. When it does, it's probably not the price or terms of the agreement that caused the problem, it's the ego of the other person as a negotiator. When that happens, Power Negotiators use a simple technique that positions the other person for easy acceptance.

When You're Negotiating, Money Isn't As Important as You Think
  By: Roger Dawson
When you're selling your product or service, money is way down the list of things that are important to the other side.

Why it's a Mistake to Offer to Split the Difference
  By: Roger Dawson
Don't fall into the trap of thinking that splitting the difference is the fair thing to do when you can't resolve a difference in price with the other side.


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