Management Articles


 

Does Your Business Have Team Spirit?
Three Keys to Motivation

By: Thomas W. McKee

Thomas W. McKee is president of Advantage Point Systems, Inc., a staff development and change management firm. Thomas is an author, motivational speaker, trainer and leader. He has spoken to over 1/2 million people and taught the Advantage Point System method of change management to over 100,000 managers in companies like Hewlett Packard, Ernst and Young, Procter and Gamble, the California Department of General Services, and the IRS. ; For information about the Advantage Point System of managing change see www.advantagepoint.com.

How do you motivate your staff? How do you motivate your members? How do you motivate your volunteers? These three questions are perhaps the most persistent questions that managers often ask. Maslow outlines motivation in these three key statements:

Key One: You can't motivate another person.

Motivation is an inside job and your job as a manager is to arouse, stimulate, activate and give the internal motivation an opportunity for expression.


Key Two: Everyone is motivated. High school English Motivation is an inside job and your job as a manager is to arouse, stimulate, activate and give the internal motivation an opportunity for expression.

Teachers may doubt this, but when the bell rings, you could get killed in the stampede for the door.

Key Three: People do things for their reasons, not yours. One person's pleasure is another person's poison. Cause, values and vision are the significant ingredients of internal motivation. If our values and cause are not in harmony with volunteers or staff, we perceive they are not motivated. The real key to motivation is to tap into their values, vision and passion.

© 1998 Advantage Point Systems Inc.

Other Articles by Thomas W. McKee

The author assumes full responsibility for the contents of this article and retains all of its property rights. ManagerWise publishes it here with the permission of the author. ManagerWise assumes no responsibility for the article's contents.

 

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